Monday, December 15, 2014

Post-Conference Report. INASE Conferences. Santorini, Greece. July 17-21, 2014

                               

More than 1400 submitted papers, only 615 were accepted and from them we included about 500 in the program. The names of the reviewers exist in every volume of the conference Proceedings.

Program: www.inase.org/conferences/2014/santorini/Program.pdf

Conferences were Co-Organized and  Co-Sponsored by three important universities:
Technical University of Sofia, Bulgaria,
Polytechnic University of Bari, Italy and
University Politehnica of Bucharest, Romania

















All the authors with accepted papers will publish the extended versions of their papers in ISI-Indexed Journals, SCOPUS-Indexed Journals or Springer Verlag Books. Our Recent Springer Verlag Books: here
Our authors can select the Journal or Book of their extended version for publish the extended version of their papers. Currently, we have collaboration with 15 ISI Journals, 19 SCOPUS Journals and several Springer Verlag Books.  Contact us for more details: info@inase.org


Update: August 16 2014: A new Photo Album: Photos Submitted by Professor Ilona Dzenite:
https://picasaweb.google.com/107588582363853147301/PhotosSubmittedByProfessorIlonaDzeniteFromOurConferencesInSantorini




Photos from Special Session of Dr.ing. Sorin Soviany
Laborator Terminale de Comunicatii si Telematica
Institutul National de Studii si Cercetari pentru Comunicatii (I.N.S.C.C.),
Bucuresti
Telefon office: 021.300.0011
Fax: 021.318.9575
Mobil: 0726.339.675
Web: www.inscc.ro











Cultural Activities - Banquet

Cultural Activities - A' Part - "Nisiotika" (=Songs of Islands). July 19, 2014. Banquet - INASE Conferences in Santorini Island, Greece, July 17-21, 2014





Nisiotika [Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nisiotika ]
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Nisiotika (Greek: νησιώτικα) is the name of the songs and dances of Greek islands including a variety of Greek styles, played by ethnic Greeks in Greece, Cyprus, Australia, the United States and elsewhere.

The Aegean Islands have a well known folk dance tradition, which comes from the dances of ancient Greece like: syrtos, sousta and ballos. The lyre is the dominant folk instrument and other like laouto, violin, askomandoura with Greek characteristics vary widely. In the Aegean, the violin and the Cretan lyra are very widespread Greek musical instruments.
v Famous representative musicians and performers of Nisiotika include: Mariza Koch as credited with reviving the field in the 1970s, Yiannis Parios, Domna Samiou, the Konitopouloi family (including Giorgos Konitopoulos, Vangelis Konitopoulos, Eirini Konitopoulou, Nasia and Stella Konitopoulou) and others.

There are also prominent elements of Cretan music on the Dodecanese Islands and Cyclades.
Greek folk dances of Nisiotika include:
Ballos
Ikariotikos
Kamara (dance)
Kalymnikos
Karavas (dance) of Naxos
Lerikos
Mihanikos
Parianos
Pirgousikos of Chios
Pidikhtos
Rhoditikos
Sousta Lerou
Sousta Tilou
Syrtos Kythnou
Syrtos Serifou
Syrtos Naxou
Trata

See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nisiotika


Cultural Activities - B' Part - Rebetiko Night. July 19, 2014. Banquet - INASE Conferences in Santorini Island, Greece, July 17-21, 2014








Rebetiko [Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rebetiko ]
Although nowadays treated as a single genre, rebetiko is, musically speaking, a synthesis of elements of European music, the music of the various areas of the Greek mainland and the Greek islands, Greek Orthodox ecclesiastical chant, often referred to as Byzantine music, and the modal traditions of Ottoman art music and café music

Smyrna style trio: K. Lambros, R. Eskenazi, A. Tomboulis (Athens, 1930) The melodies of most rebetiko songs are thus often considered to follow one or more dromoi (δρόμοι) (Greek for 'roads' or 'routes'; singular is dromos (δρόμος). The names of the dromoi are derived in all but a few cases from the names of various Turkish modes, also known as makam.

However, the majority of rebetiko songs have been accompanied by instruments capable of playing chords according to the Western harmonic system, and have thereby been harmonized in a manner which corresponds neither with conventional European harmony, nor with Ottoman art music, which is a monophonic form normally not harmonized. Furthermore, rebetika has come to be played on instruments tuned in equal temperament, in direct conflict with the more complex pitch divisions of the makam system

During the later period of the rebetiko revival there has been a cultural entente between Greek and Turkish musicians, mostly of the younger generations. One consequence of this has been a tendency to overemphasize the makam aspect of rebetiko at the expense of the European components and, most significantly, at the expense of perceiving and problematizing this music's truly syncretic nature.

However it is important to note in this context that a considerable proportion of the rebetiko repertoire on Greek records until 1936 was not dramatically different, except in terms of language and musical "dialect", from Smyrneika or Ottoman café music (played by musicians of various ethnic backgrounds). This portion of the recorded repertoire was played almost exclusively on the instruments of Smyrneika/Ottoman café music, such as kanonaki, santouri, politikí lyra (gr. πολίτικη λύρα), tsimbalo (gr. τσίμπαλο, actually identical with the Hungarian cimbalom), and clarinet.

See More:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rebetiko


Photos from our Full Day Boat Tour on Sunday, July 20, 2014
The Full Day Boat Tour with 63 conference participants sailed to the Volcano where we had about 90 minutes to walk up to the craters. INASE participants had a quick swim at the Hot Springs (approx. 30 mins). We continued on to the island of Thirassia for about 2 hours for lunch and swimming. On the return journey our boat sailed around the Caldera making a stop at the little port of Armeni in Oia. There some participants  finished their trip and others stayed on board and returned back to old Port of Fira. A luxurious bus transferred our guests back to the Hotel. The Full Day excursion was organized by INASE using the professional services of Dakoutros Travel (http://www.dakoutrostravel.gr/) with special prices for EUROPMENT participants
































































































































                                         


Photos from the Hotel (El Greco Resort - El Greco Palace)






































Visit to Akrotiri
Akrotiri (Greek: Ακρωτήρι, pronounced Greek: [akroˈtiri]) is a Minoan Bronze Age settlement on the volcanic Greek island of Santorini (Thera). The settlement was destroyed in the Theran eruption about 1627 BCE and buried in volcanic ash, which preserved the remains of fine Frescoes and many objects and artworks. The settlement has been suggested as a possible inspiration for Plato's story of Atlantis. The site has been excavated since 1967. More: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Akrotiri_(Santorini)

















































Photos that was sent to us by Prof. Shahram Javadi
Plenary Lecture

Coffee-Break

Secretariat

Secretariat and some special session organizers


Photos that was sent to us by Prof. Claudio Talarico
Banquet. Zeibekiko Night. Rebetiko Songs

Banquet. Folklore Dances from 8 Professional Dancers

Banquet. Folklore Dances from 8 Professional Dancers

Banquet. Folklore Dances from 8 Professional Dancers

Banquet. Zeibekiko Dance from our guests

Banquet. Zeibekiko Dance from our guests

Banquet. Greek Dances

Santorini

Santorini

Santorini

Santorini

Santorini

Santorini


Santorini

Santorini

Santorini

Santorini





Update: August 16 2014: A new Photo Album: Photos Submitted by Professor Ilona Dzenite: